When to WordPress; When not to WordPress.

We like Postlight. They’re really good at talking about the reasons they do things and exposing these conversations to the world. In Gina Trapani’s recent post (Director of Engineering at Postlight), she gives some really useful advice on when and when not to use WordPress.

I thought it’d be useful to delve into this topic a little and expose some of the conversations we’ve had at Isotoma over the years. We’ve done a lot of what you might call ‘complex content management system’ projects in the past and, as a matter of policy, one of the first things we do when we start talking to potential customers about this kind of thing is ask “Why aren’t we doing this in WordPress?”

This is one of the most valuable questions an organisation can ask themselves when they start heading down the road to a new website. Trapani’s excellent article basically identifies 3 key reasons why WordPress represents excellent value:

  1. You can deliver a high number of features for a very low financial outlay
  2. It’s commoditised and therefore supportable and by a large number of agencies who will compete on price for your business
  3. It’s super easy to use and thus, easy to hire for

Complexity issues

For us though, there’s a more implicit reason to ask the question ‘Why not WordPress?’
The more customised a software project is, the more complex it becomes. The more complexity there is, the more risk and expense the customer is exposed to. Minimising exposure to risk and reducing expense are always desirable project outcomes for everyone involved in the project – though that’s rarely an explicit requirement.

So all of a sudden, just understanding these issues and asking the question “Why aren’t we using WordPress?” becomes a really valuable question for an organisation to ask.

Good reasons not to choose WordPress

Through asking that question, you’ll discover that there are many valid reasons not to use WordPress. I thought it might be illuminating to unpack some of the most frequent ones we come across. So I thought back to projects we’ve delivered recently and teased out some reasons why we or our customers chose not to use WordPress.

1. When the edge case is the project

If you overlay your CMS requirements onto the features WordPress offers, you’ll almost always find a Venn Diagram that looks a lot like this:
wordpress-Venn

The bits that jut out at the side? That’s where the expense lives. Delivering these requirements – making WordPress do something it doesn’t already do, or stop doing something it does – can get expensive fast. In our experience, extending any CMS to make it behave more like another product is a sign that you’re using the wrong tool for the job.

In fact, a simpler way of thinking about it is to redo the Venn diagram:

wordpress-venn-02

If you can cut those expensive requirements then fantastic. We’d always urge you to do so.
But ask this question while you do:

What’s the cost if I need to come back to these requirements in 18 months and deliver them in the chosen platform?

  • Is it hard?
  • What kind of hard is it?

Is it the kind of hard where someone can tell you what the next steps are? Or the kind of hard where people just suck their teeth and stare off into the middle distance?

The difference between those two states can run into the thousands and thousands of pounds so it’s definitely worth having the conversation before you get stuck in.

If you can’t get rid of the edge cases; if, in fact, the edge cases *are* your project, then we’d usually agree that WordPress is not the way forward.

2. Because you need to build a business with content

We’ve worked with one particular customer since 2008 when they were gearing up to become a company whose primary purpose was delivering high quality content to an incredibly valuable group of subscribers. WordPress would have delivered almost all of their requirements back then but we urged them to go in a different direction. One of the reasons we did this was to ensure that they weren’t building a reliance on someone else’s platform into a critical area of their business.

WordPress and Automattic will always be helpful and committed partners and service providers. However, they are not your business and they have their own business plans which you have neither access to or influence on. For our customer, this was not an acceptable situation and mitigating that risk was worth the extra initial outlay.

3. Because vanity, vanity; all is vanity

There is nothing wrong with being a special snowflake. Differentiation is hard and can often be the silver bullet that gets you success where others fail. We understand if there are some intangibles that drive your choice of CMS and broadly support your right to be an agent in your own destiny. You don’t want to use WordPress because WordPress is WordPress?
Congratulations and welcome to Maverick Island. We own a hotel here. Try the veal.

Seriously though, organisational decision making is often irrational and that’s just the way it is. When this kind of thing happens though, it’s important to be able to tell that it’s happening. You should aim to be as clear as possible about which requirements are real requirements and which are actually just Things We Want Because We Want Them. Confusing one with the other is a sure-fire way to increase the cost of your project – both financial and psychic.

If you want to know more about migrating CMS’ and the different platforms available, just contact us or send an email to hello@isotoma.com. As you can probably tell, this is the kind of thing we like talking about.